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 Nubian crafts

Nubia was a place of miracles, one especially abiding was its light, everything seemed to shine, which had nothing to do with the devouring sun. Nubian light was an inner force, black shone as bright as white, and white blazed. Some invisible hand seemed to have polished the entire physical landscape of the country with diamond dust, without glare or high-light voltage. It glowed, easy, one was forever refreshed

The art forms in Nubia were divided into three categories: utilitarian, decorative and symbolic. The utilitarian arts include making plates, mats, fans, and jars from material available in the environment, such as straw and clay. Women practiced this art form. Bright colors distinguished the Nubian form from the Egyptian or Sudanese plates or jars.After resettlement this art form disappeared because the utensils are available from the market.The decorative art included mainly bead necklaces and bracelets. Grooms and brides used these ornaments to decorate themselves.Now modern jewelry such as silver and gold has replaced these items.The symbolic art included wall and door decoration.Decoration was typical of Nubian houses. Icons of houses were made to protect houses from the evil eye. After resettlement, decorations were replaced by paintings.  

 The art forms in Nubia were divided into three categories: utilitarian, decorative and symbolic. The utilitarian arts include making plates, mats, fans, and jars from material available in the environment, such as straw and clay. Women practiced this art form. Bright colors distinguished the Nubian form from the Egyptian or Sudanese plates or jars.After resettlement this art form disappeared because the utensils are available from the market.The decorative art included mainly bead necklaces and bracelets. Grooms and brides used these ornaments to decorate themselves.Now modern jewelry such as silver and gold has replaced these items.The symbolic art included wall and door decoration.Decoration was typical of Nubian houses. Icons of houses were made to protect houses from the evil eye. After resettlement, decorations were replaced by paintings.
Among the crafts which characterized the Modern Nubian culture, the most important is jewelry. Necklaces, earrings, anklets, nose rings, pendants, rings, made mainly of gold and silver, sometimes inlaid with semi precious stones, had several shapes according to the material and also to the person to whom they were destined.
The wedding party was an important occasion to wear these jewels. They played an important role in the Nubian marriage tradition. The donation of the colt to the bride was a moment of big feast known as the fadgab. Jewelry was a way for most women of keeping capital and of showing their status.
The marriage among the Nubians is one of the important moments during which the deepest personal emotions and traditions of the people are expressed (songs, dances, music, dresses, jewelry, drawings). It was often arranged also to combine for example, shares in land, palm tress, cows, etc. To this event many people and family members coming from distant villages were invited.
A notable advancement in ancient Nubia come around 6000 B.C. with the production of pottery by the Nubian culture. Comparison of pottery, tool making methods and sources of raw materials show the influence of Nubia on early stages of ancient Egyptian development. Also, the presence of Upper Egyptian ceramics in Nubian graves and similarities in pottery show the influence of Egypt on Nubian development. Pottery was decorated and burnished, and was valued greatly by Nubian culture. This was reflected in the technical and artistic superiority of their ceramics
 Some of the finest products of pottery workshops from any period in the Nile Valley are the 'Kerma beakers'. The vessels are red-brown colour with a black top in tulip form. They are hand-formed first, but in Classical Kerma (about 1700 - 1550 BC) they were shaped on a potter's wheel. The surface is highly polished. Often there is a distinctive silvery band around the vessel, from application of the bright white pigment huntite.
Nubian art and its symbols
Nubian art reflects Nubian culture ; many of its symbols and motifs are significant expressions of folk traditions and superstitions. They can be seen in tattoos and wall paintings that decorated the facades and entrance halls of many houses. These symbols recur in the designs of bead work and all kinds of baskets ,plates and mats ... etc Decorative motifs often carry a moral or magic significance : a sword stands for courage and heroic achievements. Stars and crescent are Islamic symbols of good omen ,also the black cat. Crows and owls carry bad omens . Roses and flowers in general stands for friendship and love , the apple for feminine attraction , the tortoise for idleness , the chameleon for change and a pitcher and a prayer rug for purity and chastity
Amulets, charms and talismans
Nubians use amulets ,charms and talismans for good luck and protection from the evil eye . Some are painted on walls in the form of scorpions. Some are made of braided beads ,shells or hair which hang on the posts of the bed or hang thickly from the ceiling. Baskets are made of palm branches and decorated with white shells, hanging from the ceiling may have the same function.
 

 
 

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